Maryam-Mirzakhani
Maryam Mirzakhani, Professor of Mathematics at Stanford University, received the 2013 AMS Ruth Lyttle Satter Prize. Presented every two years by the American Mathematical Society, the Satter Prize recognizes an outstanding contribution to mathematics research by a woman in the preceding five years. 
er bachelor in math from the country’s prestigious university, Sharif University of Technology, in 1999, while later she received her master and PhD degrees from Harvard University in the United States.

Mirzakhani received her bachelor degree in mathematics from Sharif University of Technology, in 1999, while later she received her master and PhD degrees from Harvard University in the United States. She was the winner of gold medal in the International Mathematical Olympiad in 1994 and 1995.

Mirzakhani is honored for "her deep contributions to the theory of moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces." Highlighted as one of the "Brilliant Ten" by Popular Science magazine in 2005, Mirzakhani is the recipient of the Blumenthal Award (2005) and the Clay Mathematics Institute Fellowship (2004-2008).

Dr. Gholam Peyman

Dr. Peyman is a member of the editorial board of nine distinguished ophthalmology journals. His awards include the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the first translational research award from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and inclusion in the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Hall of Fame.
Dr Peyman conducted pioneering studies in intraocular drug delivery and refractive and vitreoretinal surgery. He established the techniques of eye-wall resection and endoresection for intraocular tumors, and was the first to perform a retinochoroidal biopsy and transplant retinal pigment epithelial cells for age-related macular degeneration. He is also a pioneer in laser and photodynamic therapy.
He described the first pressure-controlled valve (the Krupin valve) for glaucoma surgery, and developed the first telescopic IOL for patients with macular disease. He was also among the first to implant an artificial silicone retina in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.
The National Medal of Science was created by statute in 1959 and is administered for the White House by the National Science Foundation. Awarded annually, the Medal recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. A committee of Presidential appointees selects nominees on the basis of their extraordinary knowledge in and contributions to chemistry, engineering, computing, mathematics, or the biological, behavioral/social, and physical sciences.
“I am so honored by this award,” said Dr. Peyman.  “What a wonderful surprise.  I am gratified that our work has touched so many people.  We work always to enhance treatments and improve the outcomes for patients.  We continue to look forward since there are many more problems to solve. ”
The National Medal of Technology and Innovation was created by statute in 1980 and is administered for the White House by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Patent and Trademark Office. The award recognizes those who have made lasting contributions to America’s competitiveness and quality of life and helped strengthen the Nation’s technological workforce. Nominees are selected by a distinguished independent committee representing the private and public sectors.
Gholam A. Peyman, MD, a faculty member at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, was named by President Obama as one of the 12 eminent researcher recipients of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation.  Dr. Peyman is also a professor of Optical Sciences and Engineering at the UA.
 
This award and the National Medal of Science designations are the highest honors bestowed by the federal government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. The recipients will receive their awards at a White House ceremony in early 2013.
 
Dr. Peyman is an ophthalmologist and vitreoretinal surgeon who has more than 135 patents. His most widely-known invention is LASIK eye surgery, a vision correction procedure designed to allow people to see clearly without glasses.  Dr. Peyman’s inventions cover a broad range of novel medical devices, intra-ocular drug delivery, surgical techniques, laser and optical instruments, as well as new methods of diagnosis and treatment. He has won numerous honors and awards, including being inducted into the Hall of Fame of Ophthalmology.
 
“This is a great national honor for the tremendous contribution Dr. Peyman has made to medicine, science and technology” said Dr. Stuart D. Flynn, dean of the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix.  “We are so proud of Dr. Peyman, and our faculty and students are grateful for the opportunity to have this amazing physician as part of our College.”  In addition to his faculty appointments, Dr. Peyman’s practices at Arizona Retinal Specialists in Sun City West.
 
Dr. Peyman is a member of the editorial board of nine distinguished ophthalmology journals. His awards include the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the first translational research award from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and inclusion in the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Hall of Fame.
 
Dr. Peyman conducted pioneering studies in intraocular drug delivery and refractive and vitreoretinal surgery. He established the techniques of eye-wall resection and endoresection for intraocular tumors, and was the first to perform a retinochoroidal biopsy and transplant retinal pigment epithelial cells for age-related macular degeneration. He is also a pioneer in laser and photodynamic therapy. He described the first pressure-controlled valve (the Krupin valve) for glaucoma surgery, and developed the first telescopic IOL for patients with macular disease. He was also among the first to implant an artificial silicone retina in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.
 
The National Medal of Science was created by statute in 1959 and is administered for the White House by the National Science Foundation. Awarded annually, the Medal recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. A committee of Presidential appointees selects nominees on the basis of their extraordinary knowledge in and contributions to chemistry, engineering, computing, mathematics, or the biological, behavioral/social, and physical sciences.
“I am so honored by this award,” said Dr. Peyman.  “What a wonderful surprise.  I am gratified that our work has touched so many people.  We work always to enhance treatments and improve the outcomes for patients.  We continue to look forward since there are many more problems to solve. ”The National Medal of Technology and Innovation was created by statute in 1980 and is administered for the White House by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Patent and Trademark Office. The award recognizes those who have made lasting contributions to America’s competitiveness and quality of life and helped strengthen the Nation’s technological workforce. Nominees are selected by a distinguished independent committee representing the private and public sectors.
Ancient alchemists had it all wrong when they tried to turn common elements into gold with the philosopher’s stone — they should have turned to bacteria instead.
The bacteria in question turns a toxic chemical compound found in nature, which kills other critters, into 24-carat gold, according to scientists at Michigan State University.
“Microbial alchemy is what we’re doing – transforming gold from something that has no value into a solid, precious metal that’s valuable,” said Kazem Kashefi, an assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics.
Kashefi and his partner Adam Brown perform their 21st-century alchemy by holding the special bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans, as they feed it gold chloride — a liquid version of gold that is less expensive than the solid version.
Dr. Kazem Kashefi

Ancient alchemists had it all wrong when they tried to turn common elements into gold with the philosopher’s stone — they should have turned to bacteria instead. 

The bacteria in question turns a toxic chemical compound found in nature, which kills other critters, into 24-carat gold, according to scientists at Michigan State University.“Microbial alchemy is what we’re doing – transforming gold from something that has no value into a solid, precious metal that’s valuable,” said Kazem Kashefi, an assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics.Kashefi and his partner Adam Brown perform their 21st-century alchemy by holding the special bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans, as they feed it gold chloride — a liquid version of gold that is less expensive than the solid version.

Unfortunately for would-be home alchemists, Kashefi and Brown say that their technique is cost prohibitive to produce on a massive scale but that hasn't stopped the pair from producing a piece of performance art that stylishly demonstrates their finding called, "The Great Work of the Metal Lover."

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