Khoshnevis-interviews

At the University of Southern California, Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis has built a colossal 3D printer that can build a house in 24 hours. Khoshnevis's robot comes equipped with a nozzle that spews out concrete and can build a home based on a set computer pattern. The technology, known as Contour Crafting, could completely revolutionize the construction industry. The Contour Crafting system would glide along the rails and lay down cement. Once that part of the process is finished, humans would do the rest of essential tasks like hanging doors and installing windows. Contour Crafting could also reduce the total cost of owning a home. It could also make it easier to repair homes damaged by devastating weather events. While this project is still being tested, Khoshnevis asserts that this won't eliminate jobs in this sector, but actually create more. 
Watch Professor Khoshnevis' recent interviews with major TV networks:

 

Dr. Omid Farokhzad

Dr. Omid Farokhzad is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and a physician-scientist in the Department of Anesthesiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He received his M.D. and M.A. from Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. Farokhzad directs the Laboratory of Nanomedicine and Biomaterials at BWH, which he established in 2004. He is a faculty member of the Brigham Research Institute Cancer Research Center at BWH.

Over the last decade, a revolution in so-called nanomedicine has spurred the development of drugs intended to act like our own cellular machinery, as well as tiny robots that may help doctors diagnose and treat diseases.

One such innovation is a cancer drug that consists of particles 100 nanometers long. That means you could fit 1,000 of them across the diameter of a human hair, study researcher Dr. Omid Farokhzad said at the World Science Festival.

The particles are coated with waterlike molecules that allow them to travel inside the body without being detected by the immune system, Farokhzad said. Their surfaces contain molecules that provide them with a "GPS" to seek out abnormal cancer cells.

Once they find a cancer cell, the particles stick, and like a Trojan horse, the cancer cells take them inside where they can release medicine that's toxic to the cell, Farokhzad said.

Source: LiveScience

hand-transplant-Khordad-Hospital-Tehran-9
Members of the Tehran's 15th Khordad Hospital surgery team have successfully completed hand transplant surgery during 8.5 hours of breathtaking procedure.

Masoud Yavary in an interview with Pars health reporter said: "this transplant operation started at 5:00 Am today, in ultra specialized ward of 15th Khordad Hospital and continued until just moments ago, and the surgery is almost complete, and has been successful."
He continued: "in this transplant operation, the wrist of a 25 years old young brain dead person was transplanted to a 37 years old man who had lost his hand 6 years ago in an accident while using a meat grinder."
The Deputy of Beheshti University of Medical Sciences added: "the transplant of hand operation for one's own member have been done numerous times, and there are plenty of people who have lost their hands in an accident, and we have transplanted [their hand] back to their own body in this hospital."
"The importance of this unique operation is that for the first time in Iran, Middle East, and Eastern Mediterranean countries, we have used a hand from a brain dead person, and transplanted it to another person."
He added: "this hand transplant with all details and links to nerves, and the vessels has successfully been finished, and blood is running in the transplanted hand, but whether the man can move his transplanted hand or not? Time would tell, we need at least two weeks before we can tell."
Yavary added: "measures including chemotherapy to prevent rejection after the transplant must be continued, but the transplant has been completely successful."
Masoud Yavary in an interview with Pars health reporter said: "this transplant operation started at 5:00 Am today, in ultra specialized ward of 15th Khordad Hospital and continued until just moments ago, and the surgery is almost complete, and has been successful." He continued: "in this transplant operation, the wrist of a 25 years old young brain dead person was transplanted to a 37 years old man who had lost his hand 6 years ago in an accident while using a meat grinder."

The Deputy of Beheshti University of Medical Sciences added: "the transplant of hand operation for one's own member have been done numerous times, and there are plenty of people who have lost their hands in an accident, and we have transplanted [their hand] back to their own body in this hospital."

"The importance of this unique operation is that for the first time in Iran, Middle East, and Eastern Mediterranean countries, we have used a hand from a brain dead person, and transplanted it to another person." He added: "this hand transplant with all details and links to nerves, and the vessels has successfully been finished, and blood is running in the transplanted hand, but whether the man can move his transplanted hand or not? Time would tell, we need at least two weeks before we can tell." Yavary added: "measures including chemotherapy to prevent rejection after the transplant must be continued, but the transplant has been completely successful."
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